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Buddhism and Alcohol: What would Sid drink?

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image courtesy of the Museum of anti-alcohol posters

Before Siddhartha Gautama attained enlightenment at age 35 he was a confused twenty and thirty-something looking to learn how to live a spiritual life. He had an overbearing dad, expectations for what he was supposed to do with his life, drinks were flowing, lutes were playing, and the women were all about him. Some called him L.L. Cool S. I imagine close friends just referred to him as Sid.

Many people look to Siddhartha as an example of someone who attained nirvana, a buddha. But here we look at a younger Sid as a confused guy struggling with his daily life. What would he do as a young person trying to find love, cheap drinks, and fun in a city like New York? How would he combine Buddhism and dating? We all make mistakes on our spiritual journey; here is where they're discussed.

Each week I'll take on a new question and give some advice based on what I think Sid, a confused guy working on his spiritual life in a world of major distraction, would do. Because let's face it, you and I are Sid.

Have a question for this weekly column? E-mail it here and Lodro will probably get to it!

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Q: A while ago you mentioned "Right Drinking" in one of your posts. What is that? I often drink too much. How can I make drinking not be detrimental to my meditation path? Thanks, Chuck

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To start off I should note that nowhere in Buddhist texts will you find the term "Right Drinking." I first mentioned it in my post on whether or not our fictional Sid would take a job as a bartender  (I said he would). In fact, many traditional Buddhist teachers stick pretty strongly to the whole "I undertake the vow to abstain from intoxicants that cause heedlessness" thing.

As is often discussed in this column, traditional monastic systems clash with the reality of a modern existence in the West. As such we need to determine for ourselves what it means to partake in intoxicants that can easily lead to confusion and recklessness. Because if you've seen sites like textsfromlastnight you know there's a lot of heedlessness to be had when you drink. The first question I might pose to any practitioner pondering this question would be, "Do you want to drink at all?" If you feel like you can't be a practitioner who drinks that's fine. That is your truth and worth sticking to.

However, it seems like your question Chuck was not so much "Is it okay to drink" but "How can I drink while not losing my head?" That is a great question. How often have you seen an alcohol ad that ended with "Drink Responsibly?" What does that even mean? The alcohol companies aren't going to tell us so we have to figure it out for ourselves.

If there's Right Speech why can't the modern day practitioner engage in Right Drinking? We know the historical Sid did drink in his youth but as the Buddha he acknowledged that it's a dangerous fire to play with. Over time as Buddhism spread and encountered new lands it morphed to accommodate those cultures. Today in many monasteries in Tibet and India Vajrayana practitioners will incorporate alcohol as part of their practice.

The intent is not to get the monks wasted but to take what is seen as a poison and transform it into a tool for spaciousness. Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche attempted to lead his Vajrayana students in the West in what he referred to as "mindful drinking" with mixed results. Some students would engage the practice to the point where they felt a loosening up on their ego and their dualistic sense of "me" vs. "the world." Others threw up.

One student of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche said they were encouraged to "drink just enough to relax, to appreciate your situation and to help your ego go to sleep." The idea was to watch how the alcohol affects you and see how it can relax your mind. When you feel that loosening inside you then you stop.

Unfortunately most of us don't stop there. Most of us go out with the intention of loosening our mind, celebrating something with friends, or having a low key get-together and don't have the discipline to say "no" to one more drink.

With that said I think Right Drinking would include the following:

1) Know your intention: are you motivated to drink as a practice tool? to shake off a bad day at work? to relax with a friend? to drink your sorrows away? Knowing in advance what you're intending to use alcohol for is important. Drinking alcohol is a bit like taking out a chainsaw; if you don't know what you intend to do with it you're going to get hurt.

2) Taste it: this is a very simple way to bring mindfulness to your drinking habits. Don't chug,  don't gulp it down, but try to taste every sip. Enjoy the alcohol you drink. Along those lines I'd recommend drinking less and drinking good alcohol. Quality, not quantity.

3) Watch what happens to your mind as you drink: notice the effect the alcohol has on you. You don't have to make a big deal of it but you can at least pause after you finish a drink, look up, rest your mind, and see how you feel.

4) Find your own Middle Way: it might be that you're walking the fine line between relaxed, spacious, and pleasant now but will one more drink push you over the edge into crazy town? As Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche encouraged his students to do, stop while you can still appreciate the situation.

Alcohol is easy to abuse. I don't want to seem like I'm trying to make binge drinking ok by saying it is meditation. That's the opposite of what I'm trying to get across. Instead, I'm saying let's bring mindfulness to the act of drinking. Let's not over indulge but work with our craving in a similar fashion to the way we work with it on the meditation cushion. Let's enjoy the experience without falling into the trap of confusion.

At the end of the night of a Right Drinking don't be surprised if instead of feeling woozy you feel refreshed by the experience.

Have a question for this column?

E-mail it to this address with the subject line "What would Sid do," and your question will likely appear in a future post.

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Comments

Mindful drinking

Drinking is OK, as long as you're aware of any SHENPA that may arise...In fact, it may be a good Shenpa exercise....

I am so glad that Gautama is

I am so glad that Gautama is from India the God's own country. You can check my blog also at how to stop drinking alcohol 7 simple ways

Intoxicated culture

I think it would be a great thing if the Sids and Sidettes in our culture had a culturally sanctioned way to hang out with each other that didn't involve intoxicants. Why does a party always connote beer, wine, margaritas, weed, etc etc? Why do so many in our culture need to feel not-their-everyday-selves in order to feel comfortable being with others? (Others who are also not-themselves.)

If you can't relax with a friend without the help of an intoxicant, I wonder how good a friend that friend is, and more essentially, how good a friend you are to yourself.

Intoxicated culture: didn't mean to be anonymous

Didn't intend to post anonymously -- this is Lauren T.

http://mudandlotus.blogspot.com

More thoughts on the topic

Hello all,

I cross posted this on the Huffington Post and the discussion is going strong there too. In case people are interested in hearing more takes on this topic feel free to take a gander:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lodro-rinzler/buddhism-and-alcohol-what_b_695369.html

Best,

Lodro

Chogyam Trungpa

I had an incredibly strong reaction to reading on Wikipedia that Chogyam Trungpa (I'm new to his books/teachings/etc.) was known to drink heavily (often) and have sexual relationships with his students (abuse?). I didn't even know where to go with this. Any help in learning more about this or accepting/understanding/building off of this is totally appreciated.

Made me think of the history of the mad/drunk monk. There have been several iterations of this character in fighting video games over the years including Mortal Kombat and Virtua Fighter. Ha.

questions on alcohol consumption

Like all things alcohol can be used in moderation (perfectly fine) or in excess (not so fine).

What are the benefits of consuming alcohol?

Social lubricant comes to mind, but really I'd hope we could be social without consuming alcohol to "open us up" or help us "let go" or "unwind" or "relax."

For me alcohol was an escape from dealing with my life, from having to think and feel and having to be responsible for thinking and feeling. I could black out and run away and say "whatever it doesn't matter I was drunk" or "I didn't mean it I was drunk" or "I don't remember that I was drunk" and it meant no responsibilty.

I haven't had a drink in over three years and have gone through a lot in that time. I found IDP and meditation two years ago. I escape here and there but am present. Alcohol takes that away. It's not control, it's presence. With alcohol I wasn't there. Today I am here.

I cannot think of a reason one would consume alcohol that wasn't really a dodge for doing something else, something more difficult, richer, deeper, and more meaningful.

Seems like Sid wouldn't be down with alcohol for his own use - that's my guess.

I disagree

This is ridiculous: " If there's Right Speech why can't the modern day practitioner engage in Right Drinking?" Right Speech is an essential element of the path to enlightenment. Right drinking is an indulgence.

And I wouldn't look to Chogyam Trungpa for advice on right drinking. John Baker described him as falling-down and slurring words often.

I'm not saying that I agree with a strict prohibition against drinking and that the precept against intoxicants is inflexible. Drinking can be done mindfully -- but I wouldn't elevate it to a practice.

As practitioners, aren't we spending hours in meditation to learn to relax our minds? if we could short-cut that process through alcohol, then AA wouldn't need the 11th step. And we wouldn't need AA because alcoholics would be enlightened.

I disagree

This is ridiculous: " If there's Right Speech why can't the modern day practitioner engage in Right Drinking?" Right Speech is an essential element of the path to enlightenment. Right drinking is an indulgence.

And I wouldn't look to Chogyam Trungpa for advice on right drinking. John Baker described him as falling-down and slurring words often.

I'm not saying that I agree with a strict prohibition against drinking and that the precept against intoxicants is inflexible. Drinking can be done mindfully -- but I wouldn't elevate it to a practice.

As practitioners, aren't we spending hours in meditation to learn to relax our minds? if we could short-cut that process through alcohol, then AA wouldn't need the 11th step. And we wouldn't need AA because alcoholics would be enlightened.

Why can't there be right drinking?

I also wouldn't look to Trungpa Rinpoche for a model of how WE should indulge in mind-altering substances. However, you called something ridiculous without saying why.

Mindful drinking instructions and practice could be helpful for millions of people, IMHO.

Why not? please explain.

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